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neumu
Thursday, November 23, 2017 
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+ Donato Wharton - Body Isolations
+ Svalastog - Woodwork
+ Tim Hecker - Harmony In Ultraviolet
+ Rosy Parlane - Jessamine
+ Jarvis Cocker - The Jarvis Cocker Record
+ Múm - Peel Session
+ Deloris - Ten Lives
+ Minimum Chips - Lady Grey
+ Badly Drawn Boy - Born In The U.K.
+ The Hold Steady - Boys And Girls Together
+ The Blood Brothers - Young Machetes
+ The Places - Songs For Creeps
+ Camille - Le Fil
+ Wolf Eyes - Human Animal
+ Christina Carter - Electrice
+ The Decemberists - The Crane Wife
+ Junior Boys - So This Is Goodbye
+ Various Artists - Musics In The Margin
+ Rafael Toral - Space
+ Bob Dylan - Modern Times
+ Excepter - Alternation
+ Chris Thile - How To Grow A Woman From The Ground
+ Brad Mehldau - Live in Japan
+ M Ward - Post-War
+ Various Artists - Touch 25
+ The Mountain Goats - Get Lonely
+ The White Birch - Come Up For Air
+ Camera Obscura - Let's Get Out of This Country
+ Coachwhips - Double Death
+ Various Artists - Tibetan And Bhutanese Instrumental And Folk Music, Volume 2
+ Giuseppe Ielasi - Giuseppe Ielasi
+ Cex - Actual Fucking
+ Sufjan Stevens - The Avalanche
+ Leafcutter John - The Forest And The Sea
+ Carla Bozulich - Evangelista
+ Barbara Morgenstern - The Grass Is Always Greener
+ Robin Guthrie - Continental
+ Peaches - Impeach My Bush
+ Oakley Hall - Second Guessing
+ Klee - Honeysuckle
+ The Court & Spark - Hearts
+ TV On The Radio - Return To Cookie Mountain
+ Awesome Color - Awesome Color
+ Jenny Wilson - Love And Youth
+ Asobi Seksu - Citrus
+ Marsen Jules - Les Fleurs
+ The Moore Brothers - Murdered By The Moore Brothers
+ Regina Spektor - Begin To Hope
+ The 1900s - Plume Delivery EP
+ Alejandro Escovedo - The Boxing Mirror
+ Function - The Secret Miracle Fountain
+ Sonic Youth - Rather Ripped
+ Loscil - Plume
+ Boris - Pink
+ Deadboy And The Elephantmen - We Are Night Sky
+ Glissandro 70 - Glissandro 70
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #2)
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #1)
+ The Flaming Lips - At War With The Mystics
+ The Glass Family - Sleep Inside This Wheel
+ Various Artists - Songs For Sixty Five Roses
+ The Fiery Furnaces - Bitter Tea
+ Motorpsycho - Black Hole/Blank Canvas
+ The Red Krayola - Introduction
+ Metal Hearts - Socialize
+ American Princes - Less And Less
+ Sondre Lerche And The Faces Down Quartet - Duper Sessions
+ Supersilent - 7
+ Band Of Horses - Everything All The Time
+ Dudley Perkins - Expressions
+ Growing - Color Wheel
+ Red Carpet - The Noise Of Red Carpet
+ The Essex Green - Cannibal Sea
+ Espers - II
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Brooks
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Red Tape
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Back when Brooks — Andrew James Brooks — bedded down with Antony and cut his cut "A Little Bit of Time," the enthusiasm for such was probably limited to homo-masochists, bondage enthusiasts, and Nurse With Wound devotees, an array of fans who're likely one and the same. Yet, with the star of Saint Antony rising, having him on wax is like catching him on the wax, rising into the night sky. And, so, it'd be no surprise if even the venerable Magic & Accident empire — presided over by our hero Herbert — took Brooks back to the production line and restickered this here compact disc with a "featuring Antony of Antony & The Johnsons" proclamation stuck on front. The New Boy George lends his astonishing warbling to a song that says a lot about the record; Brooks mixes a blunt beat that punches like a pen into packing foam, squeaky circles of plasticky white breaking off as the thunk crumbles into diffused digitalia with some pose(u)rly neo-classicism, draping the dropped beat in faux flute, synth strings, and actual piano to match Antony's vibrato-a-go-go counter-tenor before the boffin slices up the diva-wailing into an oh-oh-oh that sounds suspiciously like a recontextualization connotative of sexualised climax — before Brooks pulls off all of such, arriving at a post-climax conclusion into which his assorted bits break down into tiny pieces tossed in a gale/gale-blow. The obvious comparison for such disco/not-disco electro sampler-foolery is Drew Daniel's The Soft Pink Truth project; such a comparative comes closer to home/homo when Brooks does something like, oh, say, covering PJ Harvey's "Man-size" with a gay twist, showing his Herbert-homie/Matmos-mate credentials by building the beats for such entirely from the percussive sound of tissue boxes (this factuality leading to a greater conceptual thought about hedonist representations of gay culture, Brooks' thoughts like chin-scratching when contrasted to Daniel's conceptual itch/ass-scratching). The big difference between these Special Two is that TSPT is Daniel's place to play it straight (well, so to speak), making the straight-(so-to-speak-)up-and-down dancing music away from Matmos' sample science. Brooks, however, happily makes music he doesn't think anyone can dance to; all his excursions close to for-the-'floor rhythms are just a ruse, his approximation of house's boom-tick or aping of Detroit minimalism never lasting long enough to hit a rhythm and ride, Brooks e'er hankering to yank the chain away, always jockeying sounds in and out with a swift wrist, yearning for constant friction (and its subsequent heat), tossing off rhythmic bits, then tossing in delicious twists as he goes on and gets off. "Do the Math" is a song wholly symbolic of this ever-changing equation, multiplying four and half minutes of frantic/staticky Lidell-esque funk by Brooks's power of one, before suddenly adding eight bars of eight-bit arcade game music that, in the bigger picture, almost mock the regular presence of a "solo," the common denominator between it and all here being a sense of quantifiable unease.


by Anthony Carew




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