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neumu
Monday, November 20, 2017 
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Editor's note: We have activated the Neumu 44.1 kHz Archive. Use the link at the bottom of this list to access hundreds of Neumu reviews.

+ Donato Wharton - Body Isolations
+ Svalastog - Woodwork
+ Tim Hecker - Harmony In Ultraviolet
+ Rosy Parlane - Jessamine
+ Jarvis Cocker - The Jarvis Cocker Record
+ Múm - Peel Session
+ Deloris - Ten Lives
+ Minimum Chips - Lady Grey
+ Badly Drawn Boy - Born In The U.K.
+ The Hold Steady - Boys And Girls Together
+ The Blood Brothers - Young Machetes
+ The Places - Songs For Creeps
+ Camille - Le Fil
+ Wolf Eyes - Human Animal
+ Christina Carter - Electrice
+ The Decemberists - The Crane Wife
+ Junior Boys - So This Is Goodbye
+ Various Artists - Musics In The Margin
+ Rafael Toral - Space
+ Bob Dylan - Modern Times
+ Excepter - Alternation
+ Chris Thile - How To Grow A Woman From The Ground
+ Brad Mehldau - Live in Japan
+ M Ward - Post-War
+ Various Artists - Touch 25
+ The Mountain Goats - Get Lonely
+ The White Birch - Come Up For Air
+ Camera Obscura - Let's Get Out of This Country
+ Coachwhips - Double Death
+ Various Artists - Tibetan And Bhutanese Instrumental And Folk Music, Volume 2
+ Giuseppe Ielasi - Giuseppe Ielasi
+ Cex - Actual Fucking
+ Sufjan Stevens - The Avalanche
+ Leafcutter John - The Forest And The Sea
+ Carla Bozulich - Evangelista
+ Barbara Morgenstern - The Grass Is Always Greener
+ Robin Guthrie - Continental
+ Peaches - Impeach My Bush
+ Oakley Hall - Second Guessing
+ Klee - Honeysuckle
+ The Court & Spark - Hearts
+ TV On The Radio - Return To Cookie Mountain
+ Awesome Color - Awesome Color
+ Jenny Wilson - Love And Youth
+ Asobi Seksu - Citrus
+ Marsen Jules - Les Fleurs
+ The Moore Brothers - Murdered By The Moore Brothers
+ Regina Spektor - Begin To Hope
+ The 1900s - Plume Delivery EP
+ Alejandro Escovedo - The Boxing Mirror
+ Function - The Secret Miracle Fountain
+ Sonic Youth - Rather Ripped
+ Loscil - Plume
+ Boris - Pink
+ Deadboy And The Elephantmen - We Are Night Sky
+ Glissandro 70 - Glissandro 70
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #2)
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #1)
+ The Flaming Lips - At War With The Mystics
+ The Glass Family - Sleep Inside This Wheel
+ Various Artists - Songs For Sixty Five Roses
+ The Fiery Furnaces - Bitter Tea
+ Motorpsycho - Black Hole/Blank Canvas
+ The Red Krayola - Introduction
+ Metal Hearts - Socialize
+ American Princes - Less And Less
+ Sondre Lerche And The Faces Down Quartet - Duper Sessions
+ Supersilent - 7
+ Band Of Horses - Everything All The Time
+ Dudley Perkins - Expressions
+ Growing - Color Wheel
+ Red Carpet - The Noise Of Red Carpet
+ The Essex Green - Cannibal Sea
+ Espers - II
+ Wilderness - Vessel States

44.1 kHz Archive



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The Similou
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All your recent '80s revivalism has been wholly about the currency of cool, kids. Cool, that erected artifice of style behind which embarrassingly human, decidedly non-masculine things — like, y'know, emotions and individualism — can be safely sheltered, such unfitness never to be witnessed by the prying eyes of rival upright mammals. By (naked) aping the Diazepam'd detachment of the vapid, vacant Reaganist decade, the hipoisie humanoids have, in their too-easy irony, bought the myth (like — cha-ching — literally); enthusiastically buying into being the sort of satirical stereotypes skewered back-in-that-day by Bret Easton Ellis. And the soundtrack to all this has been completely meaningless music where, oh, say, a bunch of bands from the shoulder-pad era are drolly read out in an emotionless monotone, whilst a drum-machine pounds with beats so non-Neptunian that even y'mama can match them to their era. Swedish duo The Similou are happily hi-topping their way into retro-electro's laced-up retread: plying gated reverb on their keytars(!) until it rings out like a Pseudo Echo, painting in purely plasticky shades of synthetic synth sound, and parading a band logo(!) that looks the pink neon sign out front of some coke-ridden "Miami Vice" nightclub. Yet, what separates them from the flock is the way they trade in unbridled passion, these black sheep daring to wear their hearts on their rolled-up sleeves. Their debut disc's lead single, "All This Love," screams with an enamored exuberance probably unheard on a fashion-music dance floor since, like, Daft Punk's "One More Time." Whilst so much of the lyricism is so much silliness — there's the repeated motif of "rainbow stylin'" which means little, and the opening verse, "A city rooftop/ Summer night/ In your tank-top/ Rainbow stylin'," hardly bespeaks a song wading into the deep end of retro-electro's shallow, shallow pool — hearing whichever one of these two Similou dudes it is wail the song's chorus (which features "all this love!" prominently and repeatedly) is enough to fill folk with the rapture, such rapturousness infectious, the song likely to fill the floor with love-in-ish lovin', even as the song speaks of its lyrical love leading to heartbreak (like: "I never felt so blue"). There's nothing else here on their debutante ball — which, wonderfully, is an album clocking in at 8 tracks/32 minutes — that's quite so stirringly sterling; although, in a beautiful bookend, there's more super-passionate, vaguely unhinged wailing at the beginning of the longplayer's last shot, "Boogie Down," where the hilarious refrain "Boogie now!/ Boogie down!/ I say boogie 'til you bleeeeeeeeed/ In the disco light" is treated like the ultimate call to arms, having the sand to stand and deliver an anthem demanding cats forget fears of fucking-up their carefully-coiffed fringe, and to get up and actually, like, dance, uninhibited, once more (from the top). Which, whilst hardly revelatory in greater dancin'-music culture, seems wholly alien to electro's preening, passionless Planet Earth.


by Anthony Carew




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