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neumu
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 
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Editor's note: We have activated the Neumu 44.1 kHz Archive. Use the link at the bottom of this list to access hundreds of Neumu reviews.

+ Donato Wharton - Body Isolations
+ Svalastog - Woodwork
+ Tim Hecker - Harmony In Ultraviolet
+ Rosy Parlane - Jessamine
+ Jarvis Cocker - The Jarvis Cocker Record
+ Múm - Peel Session
+ Deloris - Ten Lives
+ Minimum Chips - Lady Grey
+ Badly Drawn Boy - Born In The U.K.
+ The Hold Steady - Boys And Girls Together
+ The Blood Brothers - Young Machetes
+ The Places - Songs For Creeps
+ Camille - Le Fil
+ Wolf Eyes - Human Animal
+ Christina Carter - Electrice
+ The Decemberists - The Crane Wife
+ Junior Boys - So This Is Goodbye
+ Various Artists - Musics In The Margin
+ Rafael Toral - Space
+ Bob Dylan - Modern Times
+ Excepter - Alternation
+ Chris Thile - How To Grow A Woman From The Ground
+ Brad Mehldau - Live in Japan
+ M Ward - Post-War
+ Various Artists - Touch 25
+ The Mountain Goats - Get Lonely
+ The White Birch - Come Up For Air
+ Camera Obscura - Let's Get Out of This Country
+ Coachwhips - Double Death
+ Various Artists - Tibetan And Bhutanese Instrumental And Folk Music, Volume 2
+ Giuseppe Ielasi - Giuseppe Ielasi
+ Cex - Actual Fucking
+ Sufjan Stevens - The Avalanche
+ Leafcutter John - The Forest And The Sea
+ Carla Bozulich - Evangelista
+ Barbara Morgenstern - The Grass Is Always Greener
+ Robin Guthrie - Continental
+ Peaches - Impeach My Bush
+ Oakley Hall - Second Guessing
+ Klee - Honeysuckle
+ The Court & Spark - Hearts
+ TV On The Radio - Return To Cookie Mountain
+ Awesome Color - Awesome Color
+ Jenny Wilson - Love And Youth
+ Asobi Seksu - Citrus
+ Marsen Jules - Les Fleurs
+ The Moore Brothers - Murdered By The Moore Brothers
+ Regina Spektor - Begin To Hope
+ The 1900s - Plume Delivery EP
+ Alejandro Escovedo - The Boxing Mirror
+ Function - The Secret Miracle Fountain
+ Sonic Youth - Rather Ripped
+ Loscil - Plume
+ Boris - Pink
+ Deadboy And The Elephantmen - We Are Night Sky
+ Glissandro 70 - Glissandro 70
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #2)
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #1)
+ The Flaming Lips - At War With The Mystics
+ The Glass Family - Sleep Inside This Wheel
+ Various Artists - Songs For Sixty Five Roses
+ The Fiery Furnaces - Bitter Tea
+ Motorpsycho - Black Hole/Blank Canvas
+ The Red Krayola - Introduction
+ Metal Hearts - Socialize
+ American Princes - Less And Less
+ Sondre Lerche And The Faces Down Quartet - Duper Sessions
+ Supersilent - 7
+ Band Of Horses - Everything All The Time
+ Dudley Perkins - Expressions
+ Growing - Color Wheel
+ Red Carpet - The Noise Of Red Carpet
+ The Essex Green - Cannibal Sea
+ Espers - II
+ Wilderness - Vessel States

44.1 kHz Archive



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Client
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At their worst, Client seem like some obnoxious novelty act, the two London-based lasses (dressed up in stewardess outfits, known only by the names Client A and Client B) delivering an art-school concept act created to catch that electrocash-in wave on the way to popularity. At their best, Client seem like the best '80s-loving electro-pop love-in since way-underrated/ underappreciated/ underexposed/ underloved/etc. New Yorker neo-new-romantics My Favorite, using the synths of the days of yore — even those fruity faux-presets most dare not touch — to author awesome, joyous pop-songs that just happen to be obsessed with new-wave tonality. The real reality lies somewhere in the middle of those love/hate polarities, but, given that this shows Client as daring enough to get halfway there, such a conclusion should be news in and of itself. Where electro icons like Adult. have hemmed themselves into a depressingly redressing stylistic corner, condemned to turning circles turning the same backflipping trick 'til they finally run out of gas, Client, in all their own high-concept dress-ups, have managed to avoid veering off the trans-Europe express into the go-nowhere cul-de-sacs of dead-girl-vox-over-cold-robotic-beats.

On their second longplayer, City, the pair follow up their debut s/t disc of the ought-three with a set doing less of the poker-faced electro revivalism and more of the palette-diversifying pop-song penning, their very-English voices mixed louder, the rhythms a little more playful, the piano preset sounding more romantic than ever, and, even, real strings and real guest vocalists brought on board. The special guest stars are incredibly notable for fans of English wank-rags and pop-cultural soap-opera, because, with a highly cultivated sense of humor, Client dial up, on back-to-back tracks, Carl Barât and Peter Doherty, estranged main-men of The Libertines. Which, whilst it may not be quite like having Euronymous and Count Grishnackh on the same disc in 1993 (or 2Pac and the Notorious B.I.G. in 1996, even), is at least a charming parent-trap set-up set up by the Client twins, who manage to reunite the feuding rockers, if only in compact-digital form, to show how they really belong together.

Elsewhere, the girls show plenty more cheekiness. Their thematic thrust (so to speak) is still the same: making stark comment on consumer culture, ruthlessly satirizing the soulless wasteland of the corporate world, mocking the music-biz that they've bought into, and highlighting the innate sexism existent in all the above institutions. But, whilst it's great to hear the Clients chanting, drolly, about how music has been almost entirely elided from corporate radio, or how the rock-biz is fueled by the fellating of corporate rock (yes, it's their pun), the duo are even better when they dare to get sentimental, the album's highlights being the slow-paced, almost balladic love songs "One Day at a Time" and "Everything Must End," where the squelchy synths, ersatz strings, and lingering faux-piano chords have little to do with irony, and everything to do with emotion.
 
 


by Anthony Carew




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