-
neumu
Thursday, April 24, 2014 
-
-
--archival-captured-cinematronic-continuity error-daily report-datastream-depth of field--
-
--drama-44.1 khz-gramophone-inquisitive-needle drops-picture book-twinklepop--
-
Neumu = Art + Music + Words
Search Neumu:  

illustration
44.1kHz = music reviews

edited by michael goldbergcontact




Editor's note: We have activated the Neumu 44.1 kHz Archive. Use the link at the bottom of this list to access hundreds of Neumu reviews.

+ Donato Wharton - Body Isolations
+ Svalastog - Woodwork
+ Tim Hecker - Harmony In Ultraviolet
+ Rosy Parlane - Jessamine
+ Jarvis Cocker - The Jarvis Cocker Record
+ Múm - Peel Session
+ Deloris - Ten Lives
+ Minimum Chips - Lady Grey
+ Badly Drawn Boy - Born In The U.K.
+ The Hold Steady - Boys And Girls Together
+ The Blood Brothers - Young Machetes
+ The Places - Songs For Creeps
+ Camille - Le Fil
+ Wolf Eyes - Human Animal
+ Christina Carter - Electrice
+ The Decemberists - The Crane Wife
+ Junior Boys - So This Is Goodbye
+ Various Artists - Musics In The Margin
+ Rafael Toral - Space
+ Bob Dylan - Modern Times
+ Excepter - Alternation
+ Chris Thile - How To Grow A Woman From The Ground
+ Brad Mehldau - Live in Japan
+ M Ward - Post-War
+ Various Artists - Touch 25
+ The Mountain Goats - Get Lonely
+ The White Birch - Come Up For Air
+ Camera Obscura - Let's Get Out of This Country
+ Coachwhips - Double Death
+ Various Artists - Tibetan And Bhutanese Instrumental And Folk Music, Volume 2
+ Giuseppe Ielasi - Giuseppe Ielasi
+ Cex - Actual Fucking
+ Sufjan Stevens - The Avalanche
+ Leafcutter John - The Forest And The Sea
+ Carla Bozulich - Evangelista
+ Barbara Morgenstern - The Grass Is Always Greener
+ Robin Guthrie - Continental
+ Peaches - Impeach My Bush
+ Oakley Hall - Second Guessing
+ Klee - Honeysuckle
+ The Court & Spark - Hearts
+ TV On The Radio - Return To Cookie Mountain
+ Awesome Color - Awesome Color
+ Jenny Wilson - Love And Youth
+ Asobi Seksu - Citrus
+ Marsen Jules - Les Fleurs
+ The Moore Brothers - Murdered By The Moore Brothers
+ Regina Spektor - Begin To Hope
+ The 1900s - Plume Delivery EP
+ Alejandro Escovedo - The Boxing Mirror
+ Function - The Secret Miracle Fountain
+ Sonic Youth - Rather Ripped
+ Loscil - Plume
+ Boris - Pink
+ Deadboy And The Elephantmen - We Are Night Sky
+ Glissandro 70 - Glissandro 70
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #2)
+ Calexico - Garden Ruin (Review #1)
+ The Flaming Lips - At War With The Mystics
+ The Glass Family - Sleep Inside This Wheel
+ Various Artists - Songs For Sixty Five Roses
+ The Fiery Furnaces - Bitter Tea
+ Motorpsycho - Black Hole/Blank Canvas
+ The Red Krayola - Introduction
+ Metal Hearts - Socialize
+ American Princes - Less And Less
+ Sondre Lerche And The Faces Down Quartet - Duper Sessions
+ Supersilent - 7
+ Band Of Horses - Everything All The Time
+ Dudley Perkins - Expressions
+ Growing - Color Wheel
+ Red Carpet - The Noise Of Red Carpet
+ The Essex Green - Cannibal Sea
+ Espers - II
+ Wilderness - Vessel States

44.1 kHz Archive



peruse archival
snippet
    
artist
Wolf Eyes
recording
Burned Mind
Sub Pop
snippet
rating


By the time that whole 12K/Line crew of ultra-ultra-ultra-minimalists had taken noise to some sort of wholly holy level in which atonalism equated to the angelic hum of fluorescent light buzz, in that glow you could feel the blow of changing winds and changing pop-cultural whims. As the new millennium ticked over in a computer-compliant haze of tasteful laptop tonalism, you could feel both the angry young kids and the crusty old vets longing for the return of some, well, noisy noise. The years since haven't let the team down, either, and, whilst there've been grand-scale/grandstanding capital-e events proclaiming the glories of (a) musical violence/theatrics — the Merzbow Merzbox, the Throbbing Gristle reunion — the greatest barometer of this sea change has been the terrifying ascent of dissolute dread/dead-zone zombies Wolf Eyes. Hailing from Detroit, the combo arose in the wake of a mid-'90s Motor City scene (see: The GI & The Spykes, The Thin Ensemble, Universal Indians) that the NME never wrote about. Nate Young first Frankensteined Wolf Eyes to life in the dingiest depths of such a setting, marrying guttural hominid howls to droning paleo-techno thud programmed at the most painfully slow pace. With longtime friends John Olson and Aaron Dilloway (vets of the above parenthesised acts) brought on board on reel-to-reel tapes and home-fried electronics, the trio transmogrified into an "electronics transformation" outfit.

Using the same sort of musical idiom as Finnish macho-techno micro-tonalists Pan Sonic — remorseless, inhumane beats, thudding lifelessly in an ambient "wasteland" — Wolf Eyes seem more in league with a different set of Scandinavian extremists, appealing to the same sort of primal nihilism that the church-burning Burzumites of Norway's nascent black-metal movement tapped into in the mid-'90s, their sludge-toned slowed-down grind sounding like a strung-out scream of helpless anguish every bit the metal-esque cry of rage. Blessed with the aesthetic of the down-home scene they'd grown from, the combo made their name issuing unending runs of limited cassettes, collectors now eBaying at the moon for the chance to own some of the precious missives eked out in those early days when Wolf Eyes were first learning to crawl. Following on from the strangely psychedelic/kraut-like mantras of Dead Hills, the outfit made the grandest step in their unlikely crossover, signing to Sub Pop. But, in a classic non-careerist move, Wolf Eyes've used their breadwinning/bread-making opportunity to retreat further into the shadowiest recesses of their home-studio cave; calling Burned Mind "by far (our) most unlistenable thing yet." Clocking in at 31 vicious minutes and breaking their blasts of audio-terrorism into short "song-like" sequences, the set take their haunted-house shtick to frightening extremes. It's the actual musical match to those photos of disembodied corpses that used to adorn album sleeves by the likes of Brujeria, Bloodduster, Pungent Stench et al. back in the death-metal day.


by Anthony Carew




-
-snippetcontactsnippetcontributorssnippetvisionsnippethelpsnippetcopyrightsnippetlegalsnippetterms of usesnippetThis site is Copyright © 2003 Insider One LLC
-